About

NO DU Hiroshima Project (to ban depleted uranium weapons)
Founded June 10, 2003. From August 2008, it also serves as the ICBUW Hiroshima Office.
Diretor, Nobuo Kazashi
Exective Director, Haruko Moritaki
The NO DU Hiroshima Project grew out of a project that brought over 6,000 people together on March 2, 2003, to stand in “human letters” spelling out “NO WAR NO DU!” We have engaged in the following activities.
(1) Promoting the International Campaign
The NO DU Hiroshima Project has been a leading member of ICBUW since its inception and has devoted most of its resources and efforts to the international campaign, actively participating in related meetings around the world. In May 2004, at the time of the NPT Review Conference Preparatory Committee Meeting, we held a workshop at UN Headquarters in New York. In November that year, on International Joint Action Day, we called to groups throughout Japan and succeeded in bringing Iraq veteran Gerald Mathews and his wife to the meetings held around Japan.
(2) Survey of DU Damage in Iraq
December 15 to 28, 2002, we participated in the Peopleâ?™ s Peace and Fact-Finding Mission to Iraq, visiting hospitals and schools in Baghdad and Basra. In June and July 2003, we sent again a Hiroshima Mission to Investigate DU Weapon Damage to Iraq. Ms. Haruko Moritaki gathered specimens of patient urine, drinking water, soil and other substances in Baghdad, Nasiria, and Basra. DU was detected in dust from tanks, and high concentrations of uranium were found in some urine samples. Based on these results, we have demanded that international organizations move immediately to conduct a more thorough investigation.
(3) Assistance to Iraq
We have invited many Iraqi doctors and journalists to Hiroshima, holding lecture meetings to disclose the harmful effects of DU and raise funds for medical assistance. In addition, we applied to the Hiroshima Prefectural Technical Training Program for Nations Recovering from Conflict, a program initiated last year. -rough this program, we were able to offer training and assistance to an Iraqi doctor in Hiroshima. We will also receive a doctor from Basra toward the end of July this year.
(4) Education and Outreach regarding the Problem of DU Weapons
1) Hiroshima Appeal for Banning DU Weapons (pp. 68; first Japanese version published in August, 2003) As of Sept. 2009, we printed 21,000 copies of the Hiroshima Appeal for Banning DU Weapons in Japanese and English and have used them extensively for lobbying activity in Japan, the US and Europe.
2) A World without Uranium Weapons: The ICBUW Challenge (pp. 252; first Japanese version published in April, 2008), which combines a record of the 3rd ICBUW Conference in Hiroshima and the steps made in the international campaign after the Hiroshima Conference. This Japanese book won an award from the Peace Co-operative Journalist Foundation in Dec. 2008.
3) We have held numerous lectures and photo exhibitions throughout Japan and frequently attend related meetings and conferences overseas.

NO DU Hiroshima Project (to ban depleted uranium weapons)Founded June 10, 2003. From August 2008, it also serves as the ICBUW Hiroshima Office.
Diretor, Nobuo Kazashi Exective Director, Haruko Moritaki
The NO DU Hiroshima Project grew out of a project that brought over 6,000 people together on March 2, 2003, to stand in â?œhuman letters spelling out “NO WAR NO DU!.” We have engaged in the following activities.

(1) Promoting the International CampaignThe NO DU Hiroshima Project has been a leading member of ICBUW since its inception and has devoted most of its resources and efforts to the international campaign, actively participating in related meetings around the world. In May 2004, at the time of the NPT Review Conference Preparatory Committee Meeting, we held a workshop at UN Headquarters in New York. In November that year, on International Joint Action Day, we called to groups throughout Japan and succeeded in bringing Iraq veteran Gerald Mathews and his wife to the meetings held around Japan.

(2) Survey of DU Damage in IraqDecember 15 to 28, 2002, we participated in the People’s Peace and Fact-Finding Mission to Iraq, visiting hospitals and schools in Baghdad and Basra. In June and July 2003, we sent again a Hiroshima Mission to Investigate DU Weapon Damage to Iraq. Ms. Haruko Moritaki gathered specimens of patient urine, drinking water, soil and other substances in Baghdad, Nasiria, and Basra. DU was detected in dust from tanks, and high concentrations of uranium were found in some urine samples. Based on these results, we have demanded that international organizations move immediately to conduct a more thorough investigation.

(3) Assistance to IraqWe have invited many Iraqi doctors and journalists to Hiroshima, holding lecture meetings to disclose the harmful effects of DU and raise funds for medical assistance. In addition, we applied to the Hiroshima Prefectural Technical Training Program for Nations Recovering from Conflict, a program initiated last year. -rough this program, we were able to offer training and assistance to an Iraqi doctor in Hiroshima. We will also receive a doctor from Basra toward the end of July this year.

(4) Education and Outreach regarding the Problem of DU Weapons1) Hiroshima Appeal for Banning DU Weapons (pp. 68; first Japanese version published in August, 2003) As of Sept. 2009, we printed 21,000 copies of the Hiroshima Appeal for Banning DU Weapons in Japanese and English and have used them extensively for lobbying activity in Japan, the US and Europe.2) A World without Uranium Weapons: The ICBUW Challenge (pp. 252; first Japanese version published in April, 2008), which combines a record of the 3rd ICBUW Conference in Hiroshima and the steps made in the international campaign after the Hiroshima Conference. Â?This Japanese book won an award from the Peace Co-operative Journalist Foundation in Dec. 2008.3) We have held numerous lectures and photo exhibitions throughout Japan and frequently attend related meetings and conferences overseas.